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16) Drain Stitch

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Summary

This on-demand teaching session will provide medical professionals with the knowledge and skills needed to perform a drain stitch. You will learn to use the needle driver pickups, suture, scissors, suture, scalpel, a thicker string or tube, and use the behind the knife scootering board. Attendees will learn the steps of creating an anchoring stitch, draping the string or tube down in the middle, making an L shape and D shape with the suture, and learn how to tie the two ends together to finish the stitch. Medical professionals will gain confidence in performing a drain stitch after attending this session.
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Description

A drain stitch is a type of suture that is used to secure a surgical drain to the skin. Surgical drains are tubes that are inserted into a wound to remove excess fluid or blood. The drain stitch helps to keep the drain in place and prevents it from moving around or becoming dislodged.

There are several different types of drain stitches that can be used. One common type is the horizontal mattress stitch. This stitch is made by passing the needle through the skin on one side of the drain, then through the skin on the opposite side of the drain, and then back through the skin on the first side of the drain. The suture is then tied, creating a loop of suture material that sits on top of the skin. This loop of suture material helps to secure the drain in place.

Another type of drain stitch is the figure-of-8 stitch. This stitch is made by passing the needle through the skin on one side of the drain, then through the skin on the opposite side of the drain, and then back through the skin on the first side of the drain, just next to where it first entered. The needle is then passed through the same side of the skin, about 1 cm away from where it first entered. The suture is then tied, creating two loops of suture material that encircle the drain. This type of stitch provides more security than the horizontal mattress stitch and is often used for drains that are located in areas where there is a lot of movement.

Drain stitches are usually placed by a surgeon or other healthcare professional. They should not be removed by the patient. If the stitch becomes loose or falls out, the patient should contact their healthcare provider.

Here are some of the benefits of using a drain stitch:

  • It helps to keep the drain in place and prevents it from moving around or becoming dislodged.
  • It can help to reduce the risk of infection.
  • It can help to promote healing.

Here are some of the risks of using a drain stitch:

  • The stitch can become loose or fall out.
  • The stitch can cause pain or discomfort.
  • The stitch can leave a scar.

Overall, drain stitches are a safe and effective way to secure a surgical drain to the skin. They can help to reduce the risk of infection and promote healing. However, it is important to note that they should only be placed by a qualified healthcare professional.

Learning objectives

Learning Objectives 1. Identify and gather all necessary instruments and supplies for a drain stitch. 2. Understand the technique for performing a simple interrupted stitch as the anchoring stitch for the drain tube. 3. Demonstrate the ability to make an L shape on the left side of the tube and a D shape on the right side of the tube. 4. Understand the correct technique for tying the suture ends together to securely fasten the stitch. 5. Recognize when the drain stitch is complete.
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Computer generated transcript

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The following transcript was generated automatically from the content and has not been checked or corrected manually.

Today, we are going to learn how to perform a drain stitch for this. You will need a needle driver pickups, suture, scissors, suture, scalpel, a thicker string or tube and you're behind the knife scootering board. The drain stitch can be used for securing a JP or Blake drain placed in the or as well as securing the chest tube. We're going to start by poking a hole in one of the wounds on our surgery board and then pull a tube or thick string through it as I've already done here. It is best to start with the stronger tube draped to the side. The first step to this stitches to perform a simple interrupted stitch which will act as the anchoring stitch for the drainer tube. You want to have about equal length of suture on both sides. When tying this anchoring stitch, I will remove the needle here as we will not need to use it for the rest of the stitch. This not should not be super tight. You may even tie on top of a needle driver to make sure there is some space. Well, then drape the string or tube down in the middle between our suture ends. From here, I will start with the left suture. I will bring the future under the tube while using my left middle finger to create an L shape. I will then pass the suture from my right hand through the space between the tube and the L shape. I will repeat it again here. We will then move to the future on the right. For the future, we will make a D shape on the right side of the tube with suture, we will pass the future over the tube with our left hand and bring it through the whole between the tube and the D shape. Again, I will repeat this lastly, we need to tie the two ends together to secure the stitch. You can use a one or two handed technique for this part to secure the. Not once you finish with this tie, you've completed the drain stitch.