MedAll
Communities
New

14) Horizontal Mattress Suture

Share

Summary

Medical professionals, this on-demand teaching session will cover all the basics you need to know to effectively perform a horizontal mattress suture. We will walk you through how to pick up needle drivers, load the needle and execute a forehand throw for your first part of the suture. We will also discuss how to perform a backhand throw and how to instrument the ends of your suture threads. Get ready for a comprehensive guide on horizontal mattress suturing!
Generated by MedBot

Description

A horizontal mattress suture is a type of suture that is used to close wounds. It is characterized by two parallel stitches that are placed perpendicular to the wound edge. The first stitch is placed through the skin on one side of the wound, about 4-8 mm from the edge. The needle is then passed through the skin on the opposite side of the wound, at the same distance from the edge. The suture is then tied, creating a loop of suture material that sits on top of the skin. The second stitch is then placed through the skin on the same side of the wound as the first stitch, but about 1 cm away from the first stitch. The needle is then passed through the skin on the opposite side of the wound, at the same distance from the edge as the first stitch. The suture is then tied, creating a second loop of suture material that sits on top of the skin.

Horizontal mattress sutures are commonly used to close wounds that are under tension or that are prone to gaping. They are also used to evert (turn outward) the edges of a wound, which helps to prevent the wound from closing inward and forming a scar.

Here are the steps on how to perform a horizontal mattress suture:

  1. Prepare the wound by cleaning it with soap and water.
  2. Anesthetize the area around the wound.
  3. Insert the needle through the skin on one side of the wound, about 4-8 mm from the edge.
  4. Pass the needle through the skin on the opposite side of the wound, at the same distance from the edge.
  5. Tie the suture, creating a loop of suture material that sits on top of the skin.
  6. Insert the needle through the skin on the same side of the wound as the first stitch, but about 1 cm away from the first stitch.
  7. Pass the needle through the skin on the opposite side of the wound, at the same distance from the edge as the first stitch.
  8. Tie the suture, creating a second loop of suture material that sits on top of the skin.
  9. Repeat steps 6-8 until the wound is closed.

It is important to note that horizontal mattress sutures should only be placed by a qualified healthcare professional. If you have a wound that requires stitches, please see a doctor or other healthcare provider.

Learning objectives

Learning Objectives: 1. Explain the purpose of a horizontal mattress suture. 2. Identify the tools and materials necessary for a horizontal mattress suture. 3. Prepare and insert a needle drivers correctly. 4. Demonstrate the forehand and backhand methods of suturing. 5. Describe how to correctly tie a knot and inform on the effects of an overly tight suture.
Generated by MedBot

Related content

Similar communities

View all

Similar events and on demand videos

Computer generated transcript

Warning!
The following transcript was generated automatically from the content and has not been checked or corrected manually.

Today, we're going to learn how to perform a horizontal mattress suture. For this. You will need a needle driver pickups, suture, scissors, suture, and you're behind the knife suturing board. The horizontal mattress stitch is effective in pulling wound edges together over a distance and holding fragile skin together. For example, a skin closure on an elderly patient or a patient on chronic steroids. So we're going to start by picking up our needle drivers and loading our needle into them in the orientation for a forehand throw. The first part of the future is performed similar to a simple interrupted suture depending on how far the wound edges are from each other. This row may need to be done in two bites such as seen here. After you completed the first forehand throw, you're going to reload the needle for a backhand throw. The next step will be performing a simple interrupted throw in a backhand fashion starting 5 to 8 millimeters away from where he came out of the wound on the initial throw. Once we perform our back into throw, both of the future threads will be on the same side of the wound. And we will instrument I these ends. Now, so that the knot is on the same side where the suture initially started. When tying this not sutures should be tied down, snug but not excessively tight. Once you cut the suture, here, you've completed a horizontal mattress suture.